Aliens Belong in Space

Update 2016-04-13

I added the headings which will be replacing the older headings below each of the older headings


 

I don’t mean to say that I don’t welcome visitors from other planets to Earth. If you’re out there, come say hello, we’ll probably kill you, but imagine the political circus!

Okay anyway — as I’m sure you’ve heard by now, the Library of Congress has issued a statement that they’ll be changing ‘Illegal aliens’ as a subject heading. Text of the full statement.

While the usage of ‘illegal’ was the main focus of the push to change the heading, (see for instance ‘Drop the I Word‘ from Race Forward, the changes announced by LC are actually much farther reaching than that.

  • ‘Aliens’ will be replaced by ‘Noncitizens’
  • ‘Illegal aliens’ will be replaced by ‘Noncitizens’ and ‘Unauthorized immigration’

As part of this, every instance of ‘Aliens’ (in the immigrant sense, not in the ET sense) will be changed to ‘Noncitizens’. (Edit — Tina has informed me (and as a primary figure on this change, she’d know! that this will not be a 1-to-1 replacement, ‘Alien’ to ‘Noncitizen’, phrase headings may vary, stay tuned) For those of you whose headings will update as a cascade when LCSH changes (is that anyone? is that possible? (edit — I’ve been informed by Violet Fox and Jessica, that it is indeed possible!) — great you’re all set. But for the rest of us, there are a lot of headings with the term ‘Alien’ that will need to be updated manually.

I’ve talked before about manual updating of headings before — I’ve been exporting records from Alma as MARCXML, and then using XSLT to target the exact heading changes. This time around though, I want to explore MarcEdit’s tools for replacing headings.

So to save you the trouble, here are all the headings you’ll have to change:

 

Alien criminals

Noncitizen criminals

 

Alien detention centers

Noncitizen detention centers

 

Aliens

Noncitizens

 

Aliens—Taxation

Noncitizens—Taxation

 

Aliens in art

Noncitizens in art

 

Aliens in literature

Noncitizens in literature

Aliens in mass media

Noncitizens in mass media

 

Aliens in motion pictures

Noncitizens in motion pictures

 

Aliens (Greek law)

Noncitizens (Greek law)

 

Aliens (Islamic law)

Noncitizens (Islamic law)

 

Aliens (Jewish law)

Noncitizens (Jewish law)

 

Aliens (Roman law)

Noncitizens (Roman law)

 

Children of illegal aliens

Children of noncitizens

Unauthorized immigration

 

Church work with aliens

Church work with noncitizens

 

Illegal aliens

Noncitizens

Unauthorized immigration

 

Illegal alien children

Noncitizen children

Unauthorized immigration

 

Illegal aliens in literature

Noncitizens in literature

Unauthorized immigration in literature

 

—Officials and employees, Alien

 

Women illegal aliens

Women noncitizens

Unauthorized immigration


 

False positives to watch out for either because they’re referring to Extraterrestrials, or they’re a proper-name that isn’t going to be updated:

Alien abduction

Alien abduction in literature

Alien and Sedition laws, 1798

Alien films

Alien plants

Human-alien encounters

Human-alien encounters in literature

Advertisements

Emflix – Part 20 – Hybrid Consistency

Note: this is originally an excerpt from Part 12 – Action and Adventure, but I figured it ought to be cross posted into the ‘Rules’ section of my index.

I noticed that Netflix had many “hybrid subgenres” e.g. Action Sci-Fi and Fantasy, Indie Romance, Sci-Fi Thrillers, etc. The odd thing to me is that only some of these hybrid subgenres would appear under both of their ‘parent’ genres.

That is, in Netflix’s listings ‘Action Thrillers’ is listed under both ‘Action & Adventure’ and ‘Thrillers’, whereas ‘Action Comedies’ is listed only under ‘Action & Adventure’ and not under Comedies. Weird, right?

That kind of inconsistency is this cataloger’s bane. So my first rule was, if a subgenre is ‘hybrid’ (as judged by its name being made up of two different genres) it belongs under both genres.

Emflix – Part 19 – Subgenres – Drama

Link to Part 18 – Subgenres – Documentary

Here’s “Drama”

Compare again Netflix’s listing of genres to mine.

I struggled with a problem with the category.

Some of the subgenres really are not limited to Drama and yet only appeared under Drama in the hierarchy.

Consider ‘Period Pieces’

While most period pieces tend to be dramas, sure — what about all those Jane Austen/Oscar Wilde adaptations? Hilarious period pieces (your mileage may vary on the hilarity) What about Topsy Turvy, Clue, or half of Mel Brook’s movies? Comedic period pieces! Perhaps I should’ve added ‘Comedy Period Piece’ to my hierarchy, but I didn’t.


Here are my subgenres for said category with asterisks for ones I’ll be discussing below, either because they’re not on Netflix’s list, or they were changed from Netflix’s for some reason

  • African-American Dramas
  • Asian-American Dramas*
  • Classic Dramas
  • Courtroom Dramas
  • Crime Dramas
  • Dramas Based on Real Life
    • Biographies*
  • Dramas Based on the Book
    • Dramas Based on Bestsellers
    • Dramas Based on Classic Literature
    • Dramas Based on Contemporary Literature
  • Epics*
  • Family Dramas
  • Foreign Dramas
  • Gambling Dramas
  • Indie Dramas*
  • LGBTQ Dramas*
  • Latino/a Dramas*
  • Medical Dramas
  • Military and War Dramas
  • Period Pieces
    • 20th Century Period Pieces
    • Pre-20th Century Period Pieces
  • Political Dramas
  • Religious and Spiritual Dramas*
  • Romantic Dramas
  • Sci-Fi Dramas
  • Showbiz Dramas
  • Social Issue Dramas
  • Sports Dramas
  • Tearjerkers
  • Teen Dramas*

 

  • Asian-American Dramas
    • Netflix doesn’t have this category despite many films potentially being able to fulfill it, so I added it
  • Biographies
    • Netflix places ‘Biographies’ as it’s own subgenre under Drama, whereas I placed it as a sub-Subgenre of ‘Dramas Based on Real Life’. While I am aware of the existence of fictional biographies (consider the Chuck Barris biopic, ‘Confessions of a Dangerous Mind’) because the vast majority of such films would fulfill ‘Dramas based on Real Life’ I decided to have that category absorb ‘Biographies’
  • Epics
  • Indie Drama
  • LGBTQ Dramas
    • Changed for inclusionary reasons, see my full write-up on the LGBTQ genre, when I get there
  • Latino/a Dramas
    • See the People-Genre rule
  • Religious and Spiritual Dramas
    • Added for hybrid consistency
  • Teen Dramas
    • Added for hybrid consistency

 

Link to Part 21 – Subgenres – Faith and Spirituality

Baby’s First Macro

Who doesn’t wish OCLC would work a little differently than it does? A little extra feature here, a little extra feature there…if you’ve worked with it for any amount of time, you’ve probably gotten a little frustrated at times.

This was what I wanted on March 10th — so I decided to knuckle down, look up how to make an OCLC macro, and I done did it! I’m sure it could be done better, that it could be done faster or more efficiently, but it totally works — and for me, that’s enough for now.

I first grabbed the contents of the Cont fixed field and Indx fixed field and stored them in string variables.

The macro then checks three cases:

  1. If the Cont field contains a ‘b’ and Indx is ‘1’ then it adds a 504 field with the value “Includes bibliographical references and index”
  2. If the Cont field contains a ‘b’ and Indx is ‘0’ or uncoded then it adds a 504 field with the value “Includes bibliographical references”
  3. If the Cont field does not contain a ‘b’ and Indx is 1, then it adds a 500 field with the value “Includes index.

So here it is copied below, feel free to use it, re-use it, or improve it (but if you do, lemme know!).

Sub Main
    Dim CS As Object
Set CS = CreateObject("Connex.Client")
CS.GetFixedField "Cont", ContCode$
CS.GetFixedField "Indx", IndxCode$

If InStr(ContCode$, "b") and IndxCode$ = "1" Then
CS.AddField 1, "504  Includes bibliographical references and index."
End If

If InStr(ContCode$, "b") and (IndxCode$ = "" or IndxCode$ = "0") Then
CS.AddField 1, "504  Includes bibliographical references."
End If

If InStr(ContCode$, "b")=0 and IndxCode$ = "1" Then
CS.AddField 1, "500  Includes index."
End If
End Sub

Every Occurrence of N4 in the Library of Congress Classification Scheme

Amber Billey tweeted this yesterday, and she’s not wrong.

This classification number is given for:

F2659.N4

Latin America. Spanish America—South America—Brazil—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

There are at least two things to talk about here:

  1. Elements in the population  (link to my post about the phrase), but the short of it is — it’s a ubiquitous term in LCC which is used to indicate which people are not considered part of the ‘usual’ population
  2. The term ‘Negroes’ itself — It needs to be changed, and it needs to be changed comprehensively.

Because this isn’t the only place it appears in LCC. Far. From. It.

Look, when we assign cutters, they don’t always correspond to an actual word, but hhere they do. Every single time, they do. At Emerson we had a very large collection of books about film. Sometimes when I’d direct patrons to find books on representation of African Americans and other Black people in cinema, I’d hope they wouldn’t notice the cutter. One time a patron asked me. It was uncomfortable for me, but you know what?

This isn’t about my discomfort — at all. My cringing as I told a patron that .N4 stood for ‘Negroes’ is nothing compared to the aggression, micro and macro that I put on that patron and that we put on our patrons every day, sending them to the stacks to browse there.

The fact of the matter is, that when providing a listing of ‘Elements in the population A-Z’ or ‘Special topics A-Z’, ‘Negro’ is used — a lot.

The following is every single occurrence:

(I’m only including when the term ‘Negro/es’ is in the actual caption, not counting back-end 453s — I’m also not including the hits for a specific group that still uses the term in their name, e.g. ‘United Negro College Fund’)

BF432.N5

Psychology—Consciousness. Cognition—Intelligence. Mental ability. Intelligence testing. Ability testing—By specific group of people, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks. African Americans

BR563.N4

Christianity—History—By region or country—America—North America—United States—By race or ethnic group, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

BX1407.N4

Christian denominations—Catholic Church—History—By region or country—North America—United States—Special topics, A-Z, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

BX8060.N5

Christian denominations—Other Protestant denominations—Lutheran churches—History—By region or country—America. United States—United States—Individual branches, synods, etc., of Lutherans—Mergers. Federations—Synods on a linguistic basis other than German—Other national or racial groups, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks. African Americans

D547.N4

History (General)—World War I (1914-1918)—Military operations—Western—English—Individual. By region or name, A-Z—Negroes

D639.N4

History (General)—World War I (1914-1918)—Special topics—Other special topics, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

D810.N4

History (General)—World War II (1939-1945)—Other special topics, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

DA125.N4

History of Great Britain—England—History—General special—Ethnography—Elements in the population—By element, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

E29.N3

America—General—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

E269.N3

United States—The Revolution, 1775-1783—Participation by race, ethnic group, religious group, etc., A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

E540.N3

United States—The Civil War, 1861-1865—Armies. Troops—The Union Army—Participation by race, ethnic group, religious group, etc., A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

E725.5.N3

United States—Late nineteenth century, 1865-1900—McKinley’s first administration, 1897-1901—War of 1898 (Spanish-American War)—Armies. Troops—United States Army. Corps. Brigades—Participation by race, ethnic group, etc., A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

F1035.N3

British America—Canada—Elements in the population—Negroes. Blacks

F1419.N4

Latin America. Spanish America—Latin America (General)—Elements in the population—Individual, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

F1789.N3

Latin America. Spanish America—West Indies—Greater Antilles—Cuba—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

F1896.N4

Latin America. Spanish America—West Indies—Greater Antilles—Jamaica—Elements in the population—Individual elements—Negroes. Blacks

F1983.N4

Latin America. Spanish America—West Indies—Greater Antilles—Puerto Rico. Boriquen—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

F2391.N4

Latin America. Spanish America—South America—Guiana—Guyana. British Guiana—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Negroes

F2431.N3

Latin America. Spanish America—South America—Guiana—Suriname. Netherlands or Dutch Guiana—Elements in the population—Individual elements—Negroes. Blacks

F2659.N4

Latin America. Spanish America—South America—Brazil—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

F2799.N3

Latin America. Spanish America—South America—Uruguay—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

N8232

Visual arts—Special subjects of art—Other special subjects (alphabetically)—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PE3102.N4-PE3102.N48

English philology and language—Linguistic geography. Dialects, etc.—English outside of the British Isles—United States (and America general)—Ethnic groups, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

PE3727.N4

English philology and language—Linguistic geography. Dialects, etc.—Slang. Argot. Vulgarisms—Special classes—Special groups of persons—Other, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PN1995.9.N4

Drama—Motion pictures—Other special topics, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks. African Americans

PN4305.N5

Oratory—Oratory. Elocution, etc.—Recitations (in English)—Special—Other special. By subject, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

PN6120.N4

Collections of general literature—Drama—Special. By subject or form, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

PN6231.N5

Collections of general literature—Wit and humor—Collections on special topics, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks

PS153.N5

American literature—History of American literature—Special classes of authors—Other classes of authors, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS173.N4

American literature—History of American literature—Treatment of special classes, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS310.N4

American literature—History of American literature—Special forms—Poetry—Special topics, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS338.N4

American literature—History of American literature—Special forms—Drama—Special topics, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS374.N4

American literature—History of American literature—Special forms—Prose—Prose fiction—Special forms and topics, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS508.N3

American literature—Collections of American literature—Special classes of authors, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS509.N4

American literature—Collections of American literature—Special topics (Prose and verse), A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS591.N4

American literature—Collections of American literature—Poetry—Special—Special groups of authors, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS595.N3

American literature—Collections of American literature—Poetry—Special—By subject, A-Z—Negro (African American, Black) rimes and songs

PS627.N4

American literature—Collections of American literature—Drama—Special forms and topics, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans. Blacks

PS628.N4

American literature—Collections of American literature—Drama—Special classes of authors, A-Z—Negro (African American, Black) authors

PS663.N4

American literature—Collections of American literature—Oratory—Special, A-Z—Negro. African American. Black

RA448.5.N4

Public aspects of medicine—Public health. Hygiene. Preventive medicine—By region or country—America—North America—United States—Ethnic groups, etc.—Individual, A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

RC451.5.N4

Internal medicine—Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry—Psychiatry—By ethnic group, A-Z—Negroes. Blacks. African Americans

Z1361.N39

National bibliography—America—United States—Special topics (not otherwise provided for), A-Z—Negroes. African Americans

Z1229.N39

National bibliography—America—United States—American literature—Special classes or groups of writers, A-Z—Negro. African American

Z6944.N39

Subject bibliography—Periodicals, newspapers, and other serials—Special topics, A-Z—Negro (African American, Black) newspapers


 

I want to point out that LCC has made the flip in some places. There are many places that have either changed the cuttered term and provided a redirect, or perhaps were never cuttered in the Ns to begin with and so are placed in the Bs or As — it’s just a matter of changing the rest.

Examples:

(ML120.N49)
Literature on music—Bibliography—By region or country, A-Z—Negro music, United States
see ML128.B45

PS366.A35

American literature—History of American literature—Special forms—Prose—Special topics, A-Z—African Americans. Blacks
PS366.N42 Negroes see PS366.A35

F2239.B55

Latin America. Spanish America—South America—Elements in the population—Individual elements, A-Z—Blacks
F2239.N32 Negroes see F2239.B55


 

Edit 2016-04-07

I updated the above two examples to show the that the SEE reference still exists in the catalog, and where it lives. While the cutter itself isn’t visible in ClassWeb’s normal view, it is viewable in the MARC record.


 

 

I do recommend that when creating new cutters for Blacks or African Americans, they should stop adding automatic references for the same topic where it would’ve appeared as an .N4 (or thereabouts) we shouldn’t be including pejoratives as UFs or see references.

Time

I was recently at a meet up in Boston (thanks @whitni!) and someone asked me what I want to be when I grow up. I answered “Christina Harlow

(this true story is also recounted in this tweet:

But the real truth is actually more complicated than that, I mean it was a lib-tech thing — so I went with a brilliant lib-tech person.


 

Time is so dang short, and we can only portion it out so far before we run out of it entirely. I struggle a lot with figuring out where to focus my limited amount. There are two big pieces of ‘librarianship’ that call to me, each of which gets a piece of my attention, but neither of which has it fully:

Being a ‘Cataloger

Being a ‘Metadata‘ person

These are certainly related, and perhaps my terms are poorly chosen so I’ll explain.

I want to be a whiz cataloger. I want to be a person who knows RDA back to front, can quote chapter and verse to defend my points, and roll out ‘well while that’s allowed under 2.2.2.4.5, the LC-PCC-PS says, ‘something something” I want to be so familiar with the SHM, and the CSM that I never make a rookie mistake again. I want to be deep into NACO/SACO work and instinctively know if a corporate body should be entered directly, and always create great proposals. I want to have the DCMZ1 under my belt. I want to have read all those cat & class books and written up great reviews of and analyses of them. I want to be able to agitate for change while better understanding the systems themselves that I’m agitating.

It means understanding the ongoing discussions (and issues) with the FRBR-LRM, and participating in same.

I want to know how to catalog things well outside my daily scope. I want to understand map cataloging, and music cataloging and cultural objects.

 

The latter is different. Its a desire to know more about how people are using data. It’s triple stores and SPARQL, Hydra and Fedora and Islandora, turtle, JSON, RDF, and n-triples. I don’t know what half of those even are (or which ones are capitalized…), but I fear that the farther behind I get on how to be a data-person the less employable I’ll be. I recently took a meeting with folks from Zepheira and Atlas and felt utterly out of the loop with what they’re proposing let alone how they’re implementing it. And that leads me to the second piece. Code codey, code code code.

When you have a cool use for data, toss it up on the web! Learn HTML and CSS and Python and Ruby (occasionally this thing is on rails) and php and SQL and javascript and Java (which isn’t the same! apparently!). What’s a jekyll and why does it, what’s the word: gem?

 

This isn’t a pity-party-post. I’m mostly pretty happy with my chugging along, learning things as I go — and for the most part my chugging is on the former side. But it’s not a true divide that exists, or has to exist. Lots of people do both things, and understand both things.

I also understand that neither of these are true achievable goals, everybody doesn’t know something, no one knows everything etc. etc. I need to find my balance of do-able, and satisfying. Accept the things I do not know, learn what I can in the time I have, and still leave time for doing non-library things.

Finding Patterns Where None Exist

Back when I did a lot of shelving in the stacks, helping patrons find books — I always knew where Henry James’ books were. It’s not because I’m a big Henry James’ fan…in truth I have no strong opinion of the guy; never read his books.

beha-henry-james-834
Sorry, bro

But his LC call number was PS2112 (Okay that’s just for his selected works, but it’s where the Library of America editions went so it was pretty notable).

See, the call numbers assigned to LC don’t mean anything really — they give you an order to place things on the shelf, and often subclasses will follow a pattern — but it’s not like they carefully try to match numbers to categories.

“Oh we should put books on the American Revolution at E1776, that’d be cute.”

Yeah they don’t do that (it’s at E201-298).

So why 2112? I’m a Rush fan — a big Rush fan, and the number 2112 means something to us Rush…heads. Starmen? Analog kids? I’m not sure what they call Rush fans…

121d09e29378964eea9ccb57be77bdd0.jpg
Than these guys

But I’m one of ’em.

Tattoo1.jpg
Cleary less committed though

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a complete list of every call number that begins with 2112. For no particular reason.

B2112 – Philosophy (General)—Modern (1450/1600- )—By region or country—France—By period—18th century—Individual philosophers—Quesnay, François, 1694-1774—Collected works

BL2112 – Religions. Mythology. Rationalism—Religion—History and principles of religions—Asian. Oriental—By region or country—Southeast Asia—By region or country—Indonesia—General special

BQ2112 – Buddhism—Tripiṭaka. 大藏經. 三藏 (Canonical literature)—By version—Divisions not limited to a particular linguistic version—Sūtrapiṭaka. 經藏—Mahayana Buddhist sūtras. 大乘經典—Si shi er zhang jing. 四十二章經—Translations and adaptations (with or without original text)

BS2112 – The Bible—New Testament—Texts and versions—Modern texts and versions of the New Testament—Other modern European languages—Catalan—Texts. By date

CJ2112 – Numismatics—Coins—Medieval and modern—By region or country—America—Latin America—West Indies—Cuba—Museums. Collections. Exhibitions—Public—General works

CR2112 – Heraldry—Family heraldry—By region or country—Europe—Scandinavia—Norway—By period—Early and medieval

CT2112 – Biography—National biography—By region or country—Africa—East Africa—Dictionaries. Encyclopedias

DT2112 – History of Africa—South Africa—Local history and description—Free State. Vrystaat. Orange Free State. Oranje Vrystaat—History—By period—Early to 1854. Transorangia—General works

G2112 – Atlases—By region or country—Eastern Hemisphere. Eurasia, Africa, etc.—Europe—Former Soviet republics. Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.). Russia (Empire)—Regions, natural features, etc., A-Z

GT2112 – Manners and customs (General)—Costume. Dress. Fashion—Materials and articles of clothing. Details and accessories—Headgear—Veils

HB2112 – Economic theory. Demography—Demography. Population. Vital events—Population geography. Migration—By region or country—Asia—East Asia. Far East—Japan—Local, A-Z

HJ2112 – Public finance—Budget. Income and expenditure—By region or country—Europe—East Germany. Eastern Germany

HV2112 – Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology—Protection, assistance and relief—Special classes—People with disabilities—Blind—By region or country—Other regions or countries—Asia—East Asia. Far East—Japan—Societies. Associations. Conferences

JF2112 –  Political institutions and public administration (General)—Public administration—Political parties—Organization. Party machinery. Campaign methods—Other topics, A-Z

JS2112 – Local government. Municipal government—Mexico—General—Other special, A-Z

(JX2112 – International law. Foreign relations. Diplomacy. International arbitration—International law—Treatises (History and theory)—Modern—1500-1713—Individual publicists—Loccenius—Collections and selections)  JX is an obsolete class, but this USED to exist

K2112 – Law in general. Comparative and uniform law. Jurisprudence—Comparative law. International uniform law—Courts. Procedure—Court organization and procedure—Congestion and delay

KD2112 – Law of England and Wales—Associations—Corporations. Juristic persons—Business corporations. Companies—Particular types of corporations or companies—Subsidiary and parent companies. Holding companies

KDZ2112 – America. North America—Individual countries—Bermuda—Commercial law—Maritime law—Carriage by sea. Maritime commercial law. Admiralty—Ocean bills of lading

KE2112 – Law of Canada—Regulation of industry, trade, and commerce. Occupational law—Transportation and communications—Road traffic. Automotive transportation—Traffic regulation and enforcement—General

KFC2112 – United States (Colorado)—Regulation of industry, trade, and commerce. Occupational law—Transportation and communication—Water transportation. Navigation and shipping—Harbors and ports

KFN2112 – United States (New Jersey)—Regulation of industry, trade, and commerce. Occupational law—Transportation and communication—Water transportation. Navigation and shipping—Harbors and ports

KFS2112 – United States (South Carolina)—Regulation of industry, trade, and commerce. Occupational law—Transportation and communication—Water transportation. Navigation and shipping—Harbors and ports

KFX2112 – United States (Cities)—Omaha to Paterson

KFZ2112 – United States (Northwest Territory)—Regulation of industry, trade, and commerce. Occupational law—Transportation and communication—Water transportation. Navigation and shipping—Harbors and ports

KGL2112 – West Indies: Bonaire—Commercial law—Maritime law—Carriage by sea. Maritime commercial law. Admiralty—Ocean bills of lading

KGP2112 – West Indies. Caribbean area: Dominica—Commercial law—Maritime law—Carriage by sea. Maritime commercial law. Admiralty—Ocean bills of lading

KGR2112 – West Indies. Caribbean area: Dutch Windward Islands (General)—Commercial law—Maritime law—Carriage by sea. Maritime commercial law. Admiralty—Ocean bills of lading

KGT2112 – West Indies. Caribbean area: Montserrat—Commercial law—Maritime law—Carriage by sea. Maritime commercial law. Admiralty—Ocean bills of lading

KGW2112 – West Indies. Caribbean area: Saint Christopher (Saint Kitts), Nevis, and Anguilla—Commercial law—Maritime law—Carriage by sea. Maritime commercial law. Admiralty—Ocean bills of lading

KJA2112 – Roman law—Sources—By period—Post-Justinian periods—Occident—Jurists’ law. Legistic—By period—16th to 18th centuries. Common law in Europe—By nationality—German—Individual jurists—Samuel Stryk, 1640-1710

KJC2112 – Regional comparative and uniform law (Europe)—Commercial law—Auctioneers. Auctions

KJV2112 – Law of France—Civil law. Droit civil—Security. Sûretés—General—National legislation. Federal legislation—Indexes and tables. Digests

KK2112 – Law of Germany—Commercial law. Handelsrecht—Commercial transactions. Handelsgeschäfte—Brokerage. Handelsmakler—Types of brokers, A-Z

KKB2112 – German states and provinces (A-Pr)—Bayreuth—Civil service

KKC2112 – German states and provinces (Ps-Z)—Schleswig-Holstein (State)—Economic law. Regulation of industry, trade, and commerce—Agriculture—Viticulture

KLA2112 – Eurasia: Russia, Soviet Union—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. mid 19th century to Soviet constitution (1918)—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KLB2112 – Eurasia: Russia (Federation, 1992- )—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KLP2112 – Eurasia: Ukraine (1919-1991)—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KMH2112 – Asia (Middle East. Southwest Asia): Iran—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KMJ2112 – Asia (Middle East. Southwest Asia): Iraq—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KMK2112 – Asia (Middle East. Southwest Asia): Israel—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KMT2112 – Asia (Middle East. Southwest Asia): Saudi Arabia—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KMV2112 – Asia (Middle East. Southwest Asia): United Arab Emirates—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KNF2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Afghanistan—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KNG2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Bangladesh—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KNL2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Burma—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KNM2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Cambodia—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KNN2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): China—General—By period—1644 to 1949—Other topics—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KNQ2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): China (People’s Republic, 1949- ). 中华人民共和国—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KNS2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): India—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KNW2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Indonesia—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KNX2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Japan—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KPA2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Korea. South Korea—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KPC2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. North Korea—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KPE2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Laos—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KPG2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Malaysia—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KPH2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Malaysia: States of East and West Malaysia (1957- ) (Part 2)—Sabah—Intellectual and industrial property—General

KPM2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Philippines—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KPS2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Sri Lanka—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KPT2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Thailand—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KPV2112 – Asia (South Asia. Southeast Asia. East Asia): Vietnam—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KQG2112 – Africa: Algeria—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KQH2112 – Africa: Angola—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KQW2112 – Africa: Cameroon—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KRM2112 – Africa: Egypt—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KRP2112 – Africa: Ethiopia—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KRX2112 – Africa: Ghana—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KSH2112 – Africa: Côte d’Ivoire—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KSK2112 – Africa: Kenya—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KSP2112 – Africa: Libya—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KSW2112 – Africa: Morocco—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KSX2112 – Africa: Mozambique—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KSY2112 – Africa: Namibia—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KTA2112 – Africa: Nigeria—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KTG2112 – Africa: Senegal:—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KTL2112 – Africa: South Africa, Republic of—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KTQ2112 – Africa: Sudan—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KTV2112 – Africa: Tunisia—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KTX2112 – Africa: Congo (Democratic Republic)—General—Constitutional law—Constitutional history—By period—From ca. 1800 to most recent constitution—Constitutional principles—Legitimacy

KU2112 – Pacific area: Australia—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KUQ2112 – Pacific area: New Zealand—General—Constitutional law—Individual and state—Human rights. Civil and political rights. Civic (socialist) duties—Freedom—Prohibition of slavery

KWL2112 – Pacific area: Pacific area jurisdictions: Solomon Islands—General—Intellectual and industrial property—General

KWT2112 – Pacific area: Pacific area jurisdictions: Wallis and Futuna Islands—General—Commercial law. Commercial transactions—Business associations—Cooperative societies—General

KZ2112 – Law of nations—Early/Medieval development to ca. 1900. Ius Naturae et Gentium—Publicists. Writers on public international law—To 18th century. By author or title—Loccenius, Johan, 1598-1677

LA2112 – History of education—By region or country—Australia and New Zealand—New South Wales—General works. Present situation, etc.

LB2112 – Theory and practice of education—Education and training of teachers and administrators—State teachers colleges. Normal schools. Teachers’ institutes—Europe—By region or country—Switzerland—General works

LC2112 – Special aspects of education—Education of special classes of persons—Women. Girls—History—By region or country—Europe—Greece—History and present situation—General

LD2112 – Individual institutions—United States—Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts—Administration—General. Official reports—President

LF2112 – Individual institutions—Continental Europe—France—Montpelier. Université—History—20th century

M2112 – Music—Vocal music—Sacred vocal music—One solo voice—Accompaniment of one instrument, keyboard instrument, and chordal instrument, or unaccompanied—Collections—One composer

N2112 – Visual arts—Art museums, galleries, etc.—Special countries and special museums—Europe—France—Other French galleries—Marseille—Musée Grobet-Labadié

PC2112 – Romance philology and languages—French—Language—Grammar—Textbooks—1950-

PE2112 – English philology and language—Linguistic geography. Dialects, etc.—Dialects of Scotland—Early Scotch (Scots) to ca. 1650—General works

PG2112 – Slavic. Baltic. Albanian—Russian—Language—Grammar—Textbooks—1950-

PH2112 – Uralic. Basque—Hungarian—Language—Grammar—Textbooks—2001-

PK2112 – Indo-Iranian philology and literature—Modern Indo-Aryan languages—Particular languages and dialects, A-Z—Hindi, Urdu, Hindustani literatures—Hindi, Hindustani literature—Local—Outside of India—Africa—Collections

PQ2112 – French literature—Modern French literature—Individual authors—18th century—Voltaire, François Marie Arouet de, 1694-1778—Biography and criticism—Iconography—Monuments

PR2112 – English literature—Anglo-Norman period. Early English. Middle English—Individual authors and works—Peblis, to the play

PS2112 – American literature—Individual authors—19th century—James, Henry—Selected works. Selections

PT2112 – German literature—Individual authors or works—1700-ca. 1860/70—Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, 1749-1832—Biography and criticism—Biography—Personality, character, etc.—Character. Moral conduct—Special (not A-Z)

Z2112 – National bibliography—Europe—Austria—Literature (General)—By period—Early through 1800


 

I can’t stress this enough — this doesn’t mean anything.

dp.Confused-shrug-by-woman_2_sm.jpg
I did it anyway

 

Classifying Palestine

As a follow up to my post on the H 980 memo in the Subject Headings Manual dealing with Palestine as a subject heading — here is a post on the treatment of Palestine in Library of Congress Classification.


 

There are three things to discuss when talking about classifying for a geographic region in LCC, I’ll mention them in the broad and then return to each in the specific case of Palestine.

  • G 300
  • Those sections explicitly given in the schedule
  • Treatment of the geographic region as primary

G 300

The G 300 memo in the Classification and Shelflisting Manual provides an alphabetical listing of “all 193 independent countries as of 2005, 26 major dependencies and areas of special sovereignty, some historical jurisdictions or entities, and some islands”

It is to be consulted and applied whenever the classification schedule allows cuttering, “by region or country A-Z” without further instruction.

Example: HD4824.5.A-Z is given for

Industries. Land use. Labor—Labor. Work. Working class—Study and teaching. Research—By region or country, A-Z

There are no further instructions, and so you’d check G 300 to find the country or region you need and use the cutter found there.

 

Explicit sections in the schedules

Sometimes a topic is treated with greater complexity than, dividing “by region or country A-Z”.

Example: BR500-1510 is given for

Christianity—History—By region or country

But notice that range — BR500 to 1500. There’s a lot more going on there than a simply cutter list of ~250 regions. Cases like this override the G300 memo and you follow exactly what’s in the schedule.

 

The country as topic

In the D-F classes, you’ll find the history of the whole dang world. For the most part this means a certain range given over to a country and its government, history, people, etc.

Example: DR401-741.22 is given for all things Turkey


 

We now return to Palestine in the specific:

in the G300 memo:

Jerusalem is .J4

Palestine is .P19

Remember my previous post, for LCs purposes – ‘Palestine’ refers to the entire region of the modern State of Palestine and Israel, so .P19 would not be a good cutter for a resource about a topic in the West Bank or the Gaza Strip.

Though neither has a cutter, and their absences are noted — it doesn’t mean you can’t cutter by them. In fact, LC does this on a regular basis. See the following works in their catalog:

https://lccn.loc.gov/2011332033
ʻUdwān, Yūsuf. — عدوان، يوسف. al-Jamʻīyāt al-taʻāwunīyah al-zirāʻīyah fī al-arāḍī al-Filasṭīnīyah : al-wāqiʻ wa-subul al-taṭwīr / Yūsuf ʻUdwān, Sārah Nawfal. — الجمعيات التعاونية الزراعية في الأراضي الفلسطينية : الواقع وسبل التطوير / يوسف عدوان، سارة نوفل. al-Quds : Maʻhad Abḥāth al-Siyāsāt al-Iqtiṣādīyah al-Filasṭīnī, Mās, 2010. — القدس : معهد أبحاث السياسات الإقتصادية الفلسطيني، ماس، 2010.
ix, 75, 5 p. ; 24 cm.
HD1486.W47 U38 2010

 

https://lccn.loc.gov/97957743
Salman, Hind Kattan. Women in business : the case of Palestinian women in the West Bank and Gaza Strip / Hind Kattan Salman. Bethlehem, West Bank : The International Center of Bethlemem, Department for Women’s Studies, c1996.
86 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
HD6054.4.W47 S25 1996

 

https://lccn.loc.gov/2010403850
Breaking the silence : testimonial booklet #1. [Jerusalem : S.n, 2004?]
46 p. ; 21 cm.
JC599.W47 B74 2004

 

https://lccn.loc.gov/2005336735
Analysis of waste management policies in Palestine : domestic solid waste and wastewater / executing agency Applied Research Institute – Jerusalem (ARIJ). Bethlehem : Applied Research Institute, ARIJ, 2005.
xiv, 182 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 24 cm.
HD4485.W47 A43 2005

These are all sections of the schedule instructing to cutter ‘by region or country A-Z’ and LC predominantly uses .W47 for the West Bank. I encourage you to use it as well.

What about Gaza Strip you ask?

Harder to find. Because the West Bank is so much bigger, it absorbs most of the cuttering if the resource deals with both… I did find this one though!

https://lccn.loc.gov/2010403453
Hamas exploitation of civilians as human shields. [Israel] : Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center at the Israel Intelligence Heritage & Commemoration Center (IICC), 2009.
81 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm.
HV6432.43 .G39 H36 2009

So to sum up — while there are no cutters listed in G 300 for West Bank and the Gaza Strip, you may still cutter directly to them in a “by region or country A-Z” instruction, just as LC has done.

 

Interestingly — both the Gaza Strip and the West Bank are given treatment throughout our second set, the sections given explicitly  in the schedules.

Statistics—Statistical data—By region or country—Asia—Middle East. Near East

HA4560.5     West Bank
HA4560.7      Gaza Strip

History of education—By region or country—Middle East (Near East). The Levant

LA1444.5   West Bank
LA1444.6   Gaza Strip

Environmental technology. Sanitary engineering—Sewage collection and disposal systems. Sewerage—Country and city subdivisions—Asia—Other divisions of Asia, A-Z

TD613.G39       Gaza Strip
TD613.W48      West Bank

So as you can see — both are given treatment in the explicit sections, which is good! Furthermore, the delineation is made very clear between these regions and Israel by having Israel be an entirely separate number. In the preceding three examples Israel is found at:

  • HA4560
  • LA1440-1444
  • TD613.I75

 

The final classification type is the worst in its treatment of Palestine.

As you’ve seen in some previous posts — I have a beef with the DS101-151 section as a whole. Unfortunately, this is where Gaza Strip and the West Bank end up.

History of Asia—Israel (Palestine). The Jews—Regions, towns, etc., A-Z

DS110.G3         Gaza Strip
DS110.W47      West Bank

Now I know that it says right there in the main heading for DS101-151: Israel (Palestine), but as we’ve discussed, Palestine means the entire region — and the Gaza Strip and West Bank are certainly in that region, but the rest of the DS101-151 section details the history and government and foreign relations and wars of Israel, saying nothing about the State of Palestine or its government, history, foreign relations and wars (except as regards to Israel).

My solution, or at the very least, my suggestion for this problem would be to establish a call number range specifically for Palestine as a nation-state which is not contained within DS101-151.

Mysteries and Detectives and Fiction

This is not a post wrought through white-hot fury and righteous anger. Sorry. Sometimes I just have a specific heading on my mind that I can’t cram into 140 characters.

giphy.gif
Gina doesn’t mind if I post less Serious Topics somtimes

Detective and mystery stories has a UF of Detectives—Fiction. This is a problem.

Remember our good friend LCGFT? Of course you do. Well it didn’t always exist, and even once it DID exist, literary terms were only added recently.

So here’s the thing, back in the day pre-LCGFT — we were sloppier about mixing our genres/forms and our subjects. So if you assigned a Sherlock Holmes story:

650 _ 0 Detectives and mystery stories

(Or more likely, Detective and mystery stories, English — but now I’m quibbling)

It was correct.

giphy.gif
Good job, us in the past!

 

But nowadays we are more careful and thoughtful about this mixing.

Subjects (650s) ought to be for what the resource is about

Genre/forms (655s) are for what the resource is.

 

A Sherlock Holmes story isn’t about ‘Detective and mystery stories’, it’s about speckled bands, blue carbuncles, or evil mormons.

(Seriously, have you read Study in Scarlet?!)

evilmormon.jpg
This is basically the second-half of that novel

 

Anyway — those are subjects, and then for form, we’d look to LCGFT and find:

Detective and mystery fiction

So today, a good array of headings might be:

650 _ 0 Detectives $v Fiction.

650 _ 0 Carbuncles $z Goose $v Fiction.

655 _ _ Detective and mystery fiction.

But then you go and control them — and SNAP! That first one becomes Detective and mystery stories, ruining your perfect array.

Now my understanding is that as LCGFT grows in use and acceptance that the subfield v terms will be phased out entirely of LCSH, but until that happens we need to watch out for UFs like this that convert a Subject–Form string into one that is purely form.

 

New LCSH!

As always — check out the full approved list

New LCSH is strong enough for a reference librarian, but Ph balanced for a cataloger


A couple notes before we begin:

  • All the Kara-Kalpak headings have changed to Karakalpak headings
  • Two new free-floaters added to H 1147, Animals
    • $x Diseases
    • $x Climatic factors

Arab American men

Still from
If you haven’t seen The Imposters — you really should!

Boxing rings

Muhammad Ali championship ring
Prolly not the usage they’re intending…

College buildings–Singapore

La Salle College in Singapore
Yeah, I’d definitely need a heading for that building

Cherokee educators

Susie Thompson reads a traditional Cherokee story, the “Origin of the Strawberry,” to students as they learn how to say “peach” in Cherokee.
Susie Thompson reads a traditional Cherokee story, the “Origin of the Strawberry,” to students as they learn how to say “peach” in Cherokee.

Drunkard’s path quilts

Picture of a 'drunkard's path quilt'
Why not just call it ‘waves path’?

Emotional maturity in motion pictures

Still from 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein'
Don’t we all science while topless and oily? I will not apologize for loving this movie.

Emperors’ writings

Still from 'Emperor's New Groove'
Technically works!

Honey–Flavor and odor

Picture of honey
Flavor: Good; Odor: Also good

Jews–Art patronage

A cartoon image of me.
I commissioned this, it counts.

Lunchboxes in art

e8ebc3ece368021842102b6d86c96b22
Now there’s warrant for ‘Thermoses in art’ too

Male beauty contests

1980-olympia-as-mm-fz-cd1
Only one of these men will be in Terminator — but they’re ALL winners in my book

 

Mountain tourism

metro-co-uk-4
Soooooo glad you decided to climb the mountain! Good for you.

Munchkin (Game)

Gazebo card from the Munchkin card game
My D&Dest friend assures me that this is funny

Organ theft

c06988d278bb9aa1af9de2377d7ed365
For the record, the BTs of this term are both Legends and Theft — so LC is acknowledging IT CAN HAPPEN

Sandwich generation in art

Depiction of the 'sandwich generation'
Every single picture of this concept includes a silly ‘sandwich’ joke

Scholars, Black

Picture of Melissa Harris-Perry
I’m going to miss her show — onto bigger and better things I hope, MHP

Solo albums (Sound recordings)

John Petrucci’s solo album is pretty good, this song is amazing though

Tammuz

4tammuz
No idea why this picture exists, but say hello to Tammuz, a Hebrew month

Tattoo removal

laser_tattoo_removal_alice_pien_md_amaskincare
Maybe it’s just my ignorance, but I would think you’d wear gloves while doing this

Telethons

Still from 'Parks and Recreation'
Telethons $z Indiana $z Pawnee

Women, Black, in popular culture

Still of the black women in the cast of Orange is the New Black
Was there ever a more amazing cast than OITNB? (no)


 

 Genre/Form Terms

Comics adaptations

Cover image of a Sparknotes graphic novel adaptation of Hamlet
Three things everyone loves: Shakespeare, Graphic novels and Sparknotes!