#CritLib – Feelings

Prompt for this post

As far as I can tell, this was my first critlib tweet. July 15th, 2014. Reading my history…I didn’t actually participate that day. The next one though, was about the “gender in RDA” paper

Billey, Amber; Drabinski, Emily; and Roberto, K.R., “What’s Gender Got to Do With It? A Critique of RDA Rule 9.7” (2014).
University Libraries Faculty and Staff Publications. Paper 19.
http://scholarworks.uvm.edu/libfacpub/19

In that one, I spoke a bunch!

I’m not 100% sure I remember how I found CritLib. I joined twitter a bit late in the game, June 5th, 2014 — and I was explicitly looking for something like CritLib. I wanted to find librarians who were discussing the work we do (as an aspiring cataloger, I was especially hoping to find other catalogers/metadata folks) with an eye towards social justice.

Finding CritLib was just what I needed. From there, I added more people to my follow-lists, and more blogs to my reader. It was awesome. It still is awesome. At times I may find the format non-conducive and hard to follow, and I may find some of the language dense and confusing — but I always learn something, and I always value it.

It can feel very isolating sometimes — I know that for me, working side-by-side with people who may not have the same particular passions/interests/goals from the profession can feel like we’re on really different pages, though ostensibly working as a team. Finding groups like CritLib has lessened some of that isolation, showing that there are others out there, though perhaps not one cubicle down, who care about a similar thing, who are thinking a similar thing.

Through CritLib I’ve found inspiration and friends.

So why #CritLib? Shrug. If people were talking about cataloging and its relationship to social justice somewhere else, I’d go and talk about it there. I ‘participate’ (mostly lurk, sometimes post) on a variety of listservs, and while the discussion (particularly on PCC) can be way more nitty-gritty detailed about particular rules and interpretations (and I love that) they very rarely dig into the whys and wherefores of what we do beyond the FISO user tasks.

Not to poo-poo the user tasks, but which users — is not a question that gets addressed on those listservs. I only find people digging into those questions on #CritLib.

So that’s why I do it.

Thanks y’all! See you next time.

 

 

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